Outriders – Review – Swedish PC Gamer

Outriders shows that most things are better in the team of good friends, from fantastically sloppy entertainment violence to shared frustration over bugs.

In Star Trek, at least in the good series, a picture is painted of an optimistic future where humanity has overcome many of its shortcomings and learned to cooperate across all borders. Well, you can forget about it, because in Outriders we are served a space vision where humanity is a bundle of miserable assholes – the whole pile. But it’s a pretty entertaining future nonetheless.

The story in People Can Fly’s new game is probably not the most original ever, but the script has a twinkle in its eye that makes me twitch. I may not take this dark vision of the future very seriously, but I do not think we are supposed to do that, either. We are offered much more seriousness than in the developer’s underrated and hysterical action comedy Bulletstorm, By all means. But there is a gap in the lines and in the narrative that prevents the whole thing from becoming a cumbersome, pretentious or depressing story.

In any case, it’s all about how humanity escapes the earth to another planet, which we hope will become a new paradise. Once there, a mysterious storm puts an end to all possible future plans and throws the colonizers into a long war, while your character lies in cryo-sleep for a number of years. Once you wake up, everything has gone as far as hell as it goes, but you discover that you have superhuman powers and decide to do something about it. Type. Because like everyone else, the main character is also something of a sarcastic asshole when he adds that page.

Also read: It Takes Two – The Review

Briefly

What is it?

A fantastically violent lootershooter with a focus on co-op.

Developer

People Can Fly

Publisher

Square Enix

Webb

outriders.square-enix-games.com/en-us/

Approximate price

600kr

PEGI

18

Tested on

Intel Core i5 7600k

GTX 1070

16 GB RAM

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